Paul Pierce

Are the Brooklyn Nets the NBA's New "Bad Guys"?

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In an article written by Chris Ryan, Grantland explores if the Brooklyn Nets are the NBA’s new “bad guys”. Ryan begins his piece by accurately saying that the Nets are the new guys at the party, as this will be the first time the team is really contending for a championship. Then, things get good:

“The Nets are not subtle. They dropped a giant, rust-colored monstrosity in the middle of the busiest intersection in Brooklyn, they hired a future Hall of Famer to be their coach, they traded for a division rival’s two most iconic players, and when they get cold they warm their hands by burning copies of the NBA’s salary cap rules. Is your team mired in player contract hell? Sorry to hear that. Do they play in a decrepit old arena that’s more suited for minor league hockey than professional basketball? Those are the breaks. Does your owner not know how to Jet Ski? Tough.

The Nets are the bad guys.”

Ryan concludes by saying that even though in the NBA today, many teams are building for the future, the Nets refused to simply build through the draft and instead made trades to be all-in and win right now.

But does this make them “bad”? It is not bad that they want to win, but some could consider it bad how the Nets completely through the NBA’s salary cap rules out the window and will have the highest payroll in NBA history this season. I understand that this could cause some people not to like this team, but will people hate them more than Lebron James and the 2-time defending champ Heat? We will soon find out.

The most amazing piece about all this is the fact that we are talking about the Nets, not the Knicks or Celtics or Lakers. Just two years ago, this team was floundering in New Jersey and starting Shelden Williams and Marshon Brooks. Now, one can argue that they are the “bad guys” of the NBA. For a long-time Nets fan, this is all very unbelievable.

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